Archive for January, 2013

Calculating Child Support In Virginia

Saturday, January 12th, 2013

A few years ago I wrote a blog post about how to calculate child support in Virginia (see the post here).

Basically, Virginia has decided that a child should be able to share in the standard of living of the parents and the parents’ gross monthly income is used as a means of determining that standard of living.

Virginia also recognizes that some things are going to cost the same whether they are used by one child or 3 children, so the child support obligation is a ‘unitary’ obligation for the total number of children and not a set amount for each child.  For example, a family income of $5,000 per month yields a total child support obligation of $666 for one child, $1036 for two children (an increase of $370 for the second child), $1295 for three children (an increase of $259 for the third child), etc.  Whether you like this idea or not tends to depend on whether you are paying or receiving the child support payment, and whether you are just starting your child support obligation or your child is reaching the age at which a child support payment is no longer required.

The mechanics are still the same as when I wrote the previous post and the support numbers are still available in the Code of Virginia at section 20-108.2.  And there are still a number of specific details that might cause your individual case to be calculated just a little bit differently.

What has changed is that there used to be a lot of places online where you could find a child support calculator.  Notably, the Department of Social Services used to have an online calculator and consumers could go there to get an estimate of what they might receive, or what they might be ordered to pay.  There is still a menu item on the DSS website pointing you to a page to calculate Child Support.  However, that page now tells you that they no longer provide the calculator and you should search on the internet for a place to purchase software to do the calculation for you.

I’m an attorney, and I calculate child support every week, so it might make sense for me to purchase the software.  However, you might only want to calculate child support once a year at most and it doesn’t really make sense for you to purchase anything.  So I wanted to see if I could find a place on the internet to send my clients who were wanting to figure out what might happen to their child support if they got a raise (or a reduction) in pay.

My new favorite place to find Virginia online child support calculations is by going to SupportSolver.com.

A parent who doesn’t deal with child support all the time may not know what goes into each specific line, but they can always just enter the basic income information and get a good starting estimate of the support amount.  Reading the line items on the form can also be a good tool for forming questions to ask your attorney when you meet to discuss child support.

If you have any questions about this or any other legal subject, please feel free to give us a call at 757-234-4650 or visit our website at http://www.BeaversLaw.com.

What is a ‘no fault’ divorce?

Sunday, January 6th, 2013

People sometimes get the terms ‘uncontested’ and ‘no fault’ confused when they talk about divorce.

An uncontested divorce is one in which the parties agree to all of the issues.  I wrote a blog post that goes into more detail here.

A ‘no fault’ divorce is one in which there are no other legal grounds for divorce.  In Virginia, this means that there has been no adultery, or cruelty (or those grounds cannot be proved).

This doesn’t mean that both spouses are angels and that the husband or wife has never done anything that has made the other spouse unhappy or angry or feeling that they could not stay married.  It just means that there are no sufficient and provable legal grounds for the divorce.

In other states it might be called ‘irreconcilable differences’.  I had one client tell me that there were irreconcilable differences in their marriage because he wanted a divorce and his wife didn’t.

In Virginia, you can file for a no fault divorce if you have been separated for a period of one year.  If there are no minor children and there is a written and signed separation agreement, this time frame can be reduced to six months.

The spouses can (and often do) still argue over the division of property, the division of debts, the payment of spousal support, issues regarding the children (custody, visitation and support) so a ‘no fault’ divorce is often not a simple matter at all.  Some no fault divorce cases can go on for years while the spouses fight over different issues.  As you can see, this is very different from an uncontested divorce!

If you have any questions about this or any other legal subject, please feel free to give us a call at 757-234-4650 or visit our website at http://www.BeaversLaw.com.

Another New Year! Time to review your estate plan!

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

Happy New Year!  I hope that everyone has a great and wonderful 2013.

And, to get things off to a good start, I’d like to suggest that you review your estate plan to make sure it is up to date and has taken into account all of life’s changes since you created the previous version.

New members to the family?  Some members no longer with us?  Perhaps a new pet that you want to make sure is taken care of if you are not able to care for him or her yourself?  Have you become involved in a new charitable organization that you think deserves a gift?  Perhaps the person you have named as the agent under your Power of Attorney is no longer capable or willing to do the job?  Perhaps someone in your family has received a college degree that would make them a better fit for the job of executor or agent?  Perhaps you have new acquisitions that need to be re-titled in the name of your trust?  Planning a job change this year?  Perhaps retirement?  Is your health status changing?

This is a good time to take a few minutes to just think about these ideas.  And if you think your estate plans needs to be updated, please give us a call.  We’d be glad to help!

If you have any questions about this or any other legal subject, please feel free to give us a call at 757-234-4650 or visit our website at http://www.BeaversLaw.com.